Related Online Content for “Capitalism and Freedom” by Milton Friedman

by Danny Fenster

This chapter is a free excerpt from Quicklet on Capitalism and Freedom.

Review From The Economist

www.economist.com/node/8311321?story_id=8311321

“Few readers will share Professor Friedman's generalised distrust of government. Yet many will accept a good deal of what he has to say about particular types of government action and about other impediments to the working of the price mechanism.”


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Review From The Economist

www.economist.com/node/8311321?story_id=8311321

“Few readers will share Professor Friedman's generalised distrust of government. Yet many will accept a good deal of what he has to say about particular types of government action and about other impediments to the working of the price mechanism.”

Review From Tom Butler-Bowden

Capitalism and Freedom is a reiteration of what Scottish economist Adam Smith had said less than two centuries before – that, left to their own devices and free of excessive government control, people prosper and create civilized communities.”

www.butler-bowdon.com/Milton-Friedman-Capitalism-And-Freedom

From The Economist:

Mr. Friedman was hard at work spreading his ideas when he passed away. This brief commentary on Friedman’s life and ideas from The Economist takes stock of the influence the Chicago economist had, paying particular attention to how far the world needs to go in realizing Friedman’s vision.  

www.economist.com/node/8319515

From Third World Traveler:

This highly critical essay shows how controversial Friedman was. Voluminous attacks have been levied from the political left about Friedman’s alleged callousness and opportunism. The figure head of this argument is the author and journalist for the Nation magazine Naomi Klein, whose book The Shock Doctrine claimed that Friedman and his University of Chicago colleagues used the language of free markets and free trade to almost conspiratorially move wealth into the hands of ever fewer wealthy elites.

The deregulation Friedman advocates for in the name of personal freedom, they claim, are actually just measures that allow corporations and the wealthy to do as they please. “Every nation Friedman’s ideology touched took pain,” writes the author of this article, “but it wasn’t the well-off who suffered, just ordinary working people targeted for profit in pursuit of ‘economic freedom.’”

www.thirdworldtraveler.com/Economics/Milton_Friedman_Unmasked.html

From SameThoughts:

This provides a chapter-by-chapter explanation of the book’s main points, and reflects the author’s changing attitude towards Friedman for the better since having read the book.

samethoughts.blogspot.com/2008/09/capitalism-and-freedom-review.html

From The Economist:

This article was written shortly after Friedman’s death, and recounts his life in childhood and academia, painting Friedman as a fighter for freedom and liberal ideals in a time in which his views were unpopular.

www.economist.com/node/8313925

From the New York Review of Books:

This is a long article by Paul Krugman, the liberal economics writer for the New York Times. Krugman pays his respects to the influential and analytically rigorous economist he sees in Friedman, but criticizes as dishonest and close-minded Friedman’s public pronouncements on more general grounds of political philosophy.

www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2007/feb/15/who-was-milton-friedman/?pagination=false

From the Hoover Institute, at Stanford University:

Available here from the Hoover Institute, at Stanford University, is an op-ed piece written by Friedman for the New York Times in 1999. Here Friedman criticizes the Social Security system much more directly and vehemently than in Capitalism and Freedom. He calls social security a Ponzi scheme and the payroll taxes used to fund it a “regressive tax on productive activity.” A long time critic of mandatory payments for social security, his language and opinions became more forceful over time.

www.hoover.org/publications/hoover-digest/article/7523

From the New York Times:

This op-ed, also written by Friedman and published in the New York Times Magazine in 1970, elaborates more forcefully on the idea that the notion of “corporate responsibility” is false, socialist and a threat to freedom. It too illustrates the change in tone of many of his arguments over time.

www.colorado.edu/studentgroups/libertarians/issues/friedman-soc-resp-business.html

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