Logistics Of A Cooking Class

by Alex Tishman

This chapter is a free excerpt from The Best Book on How To Become A Private Chef.

Highlights:

  • One of the benefits of teaching classes is the ability to create a rapport with repeat clients.
  • Make recipe cards of the menu you have planned, and hand them out to the students to use as a guide for the class and a keepsake afterward.
I usually teach 2 to 3 cooking classes per week—many of them recurring, which means I have an opportunity to develop a real rapport with my students. While the pay isn’t as high as it typically is with a private dinner event, the fact that the income is consistent and I’m able to connect with clients on an entirely different level makes teaching one of my favorite parts of being a private chef.

Generally, cooking classes begin at around 3 or 4 in the afternoon. It’s a good idea to bring your own equipment, since you’ll know what you need and will be familiar with how it works. This has the added benefit of being an automatic springboard for conversation with your students—they’ll want to know things like why you have those knives, or where you got that particular pan, and conversation and instruction can naturally flow from there.

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Highlights:

  • One of the benefits of teaching classes is the ability to create a rapport with repeat clients.
  • Make recipe cards of the menu you have planned, and hand them out to the students to use as a guide for the class and a keepsake afterward.
I usually teach 2 to 3 cooking classes per week—many of them recurring, which means I have an opportunity to develop a real rapport with my students. While the pay isn’t as high as it typically is with a private dinner event, the fact that the income is consistent and I’m able to connect with clients on an entirely different level makes teaching one of my favorite parts of being a private chef.

Generally, cooking classes begin at around 3 or 4 in the afternoon. It’s a good idea to bring your own equipment, since you’ll know what you need and will be familiar with how it works. This has the added benefit of being an automatic springboard for conversation with your students—they’ll want to know things like why you have those knives, or where you got that particular pan, and conversation and instruction can naturally flow from there.

The ideal class size is typically no more than 8 students. Beyond that, the kitchen gets crowded and it’s hard for everyone to see what’s happening at any given time. The tone should be informal and fun— no tests, no raising of hands, no dress code. You should be relaxed, and should encourage the same in your students.

For the independent private chef, most clients looking for an instructor will come through referrals. When doing events, you can let people know that you also teach classes in the home or for different organizations. When you do get a class, be sure to tell your students to let others know that you are available.
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